Before the Log Cabin Technique
Thog make fire

Let’s be real folks, Thog probably doesn’t know shit about the Log Cabin Technique.  Thog also spent a lot of nights freezing his ass off.  The fact is, Thog wasn’t really smart enough to create a hotbed of genius to stay warm and cook, he struggled through till fire happened.

 

History of Making Fire

Use your Log Cabin Technique here
Great stone fire pit

When you consider the history of the man, fire is closely tied to the survivability of Man.  Fire has brought communities together and destroyed them.  Sure, there are other techniques for fire-making.  In other articles, my colleagues and I will cover minimalist fire-making.  That’s not this article.  Thankfully, history has brought us to a point where we are able to make fire in the comfort of our own backyards, with whatever we choose to use.  Which I happen to love.

Log Choice

Wedge for Log Cabin
Perfectly split wood

For this technique, the best wood to use is wedge or square shaped.  Having the bark removed and wood grain exposed allows for a quicker, better burn.  Another important thing is to make sure the wood is dry.  If it is freshly cut wood, you are looking at a minimum of 6 months before you should technically burn it.  Don’t worry, though, there is a trick for that, so long as you have older dry wood too.

The Log Cabin Technique

Enter the greatest technique for starting a fire at home.  The Log Cabin is quite simply when you place two logs parallel to each other, with enough space between them to put my favorite fire starter, non-foam egg carton (that cardboard shit burns like crazy).  Next, you stack two logs on top of the first two, laying across them.  These are placed with just enough space between them to place kindling.  Finally, you place two more logs across the second layer with smaller space between them (ensuring there is still enough space for oxygen to flow).  Even though I said finally, you can really make this as many layers as you choose.

Log Cabin made by author
Log Cabin made by me with egg crate and kindling

The trick with wet wood…

Now, the trick I mentioned previously for newer and/or wet wood.  The key here is to intermingle both.  First, use dry wood for the bottom layer and preferably the second layer.  Put the wet wood at the top layers so it is essentially speed-dried and the fire will be hot enough to burn it anyway.

Until next time, burn smart and burn safely.

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